Robina Institute of Criminal Law & Criminal Justice http://www.robinainstitute.org University of Minnesota Law School Thu, 26 May 2016 15:46:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Probation and Mass Incarceration: The Ironies of Correctional Practice http://www.robinainstitute.org/publications/probation-mass-incarceration-ironies-correctional-practice/ Thu, 26 May 2016 15:46:37 +0000 http://www.robinainstitute.org/?p=6455 The Federal Sentencing Reporter recently published an article by Robina Institute Probation Revocation Project Director Ron Corbett on “Probation and Mass Incarceration: The Ironies of Correctional Practice” in their April issue. The article discusses some potential ways to reduce recidivism … Continue reading

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The Federal Sentencing Reporter recently published an article by Robina Institute Probation Revocation Project Director Ron Corbett on “Probation and Mass Incarceration: The Ironies of Correctional Practice” in their April issue.
The article discusses some potential ways to reduce recidivism and probation revocations.
As of this announcement, the April issue of FSR is not yet available online.

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Model Penal Code,Tentative Draft No.4 http://www.robinainstitute.org/publications/model-penal-codetentative-draft-no-4/ Wed, 25 May 2016 19:27:00 +0000 http://www.robinainstitute.org/?p=6449 The Model Penal Code,Tentative Draft No.4 was approved at the American Law Institute’s (ALI) annual meeting in May 2016. This is the fourth of five drafts scheduled in the Model Penal Code: Sentencing project, as a whole. The fifth and final draft is slated … Continue reading

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The Model Penal Code,Tentative Draft No.4 was approved at the American Law Institute’s (ALI) annual meeting in May 2016. This is the fourth of five drafts scheduled in the Model Penal Code: Sentencing project, as a whole. The fifth and final draft is slated for approval in May 2017. The Robina Institute’s Co-Director Professor Kevin Reitz (University of Minnesota Law School) is Reporter and Robina External Co-Director of the Sentencing Law and Policy Program Assistant Professor Cecelia Klingele (University of Wisconsin Law School) is Associate Reporter.

From the American Law Institute on the Model Penal Code: Sentencing:

“The Model Penal Code took 300 years of American criminal law and distilled a coherent and philosophically justifiable statement of the bounds and details of the criminal sanction. Work on the Code itself was largely completed by 1962; the six volumes of updated and greatly expanded Commentaries that were published between 1980 and 1985 were limited to Parts I and II and therefore did not address the sentencing and corrections provisions. The current project is revisiting those provisions in light of the many changes in sentencing philosophy and practice that have taken place in the more than 40 years since these matters were first addressed in the Model Code. The project also takes into account the contemporary controversy about the appropriate length of American criminal sentences and the present widespread dissatisfaction with the rules and procedures used to determine them.”

Read more about the Model Penal Code: Sentencinghere.

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Parole Release & Revocation Advisory Council Welcomes Joan Petersilia http://www.robinainstitute.org/news/parole-release-revocation-advisory-council-welcomes-joan-petersilia/ Thu, 19 May 2016 17:15:28 +0000 http://www.robinainstitute.org/?p=6417 The Robina Institute is very pleased to announce that Professor Joan Petersilia (Stanford University) has joined the Parole Release and Revocation Advisory Council. Professor Petersilia is Faculty Co-Director of the Stanford Criminal Justice Center. She has spent over 30 years … Continue reading

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The Robina Institute is very pleased to announce that Professor Joan Petersilia (Stanford University) has joined the Parole Release and Revocation Advisory Council.

Professor Petersilia is Faculty Co-Director of the Stanford Criminal Justice Center.

She has spent over 30 years studying the performance of U.S. criminal justice agencies and has been instrumental in affecting sentencing and corrections reform in California and throughout the United States. She is the author of 11 books about crime and public policy, and her research on parole reform, prisoner reintegration and sentencing policy has fueled changes in policies throughout the nation. A criminologist with a background in empirical research and social science, Dr. Petersilia is also faculty co-director for the Stanford Criminal Justice Center (SCJC), focusing on policies related to crime control, sentencing, and corrections, and developing nonpartisan analyses and recommendations intended to aid public officials, legal practitioners, and the public in understanding criminal justice policy at the state and national levels. She teaches classes at Stanford Law School on juvenile justice, prisons, community corrections, policy analysis, research methods, and criminal sentencing.
Professor Petersilia was recently honored with the prestigious Stockholm Prize in Criminology (the Nobel Prize in criminology) for her work on prisoner reentry and supporting ex-offenders following release from prison. As the most prestigious award that a criminologist can receive, the Stockholm Prize is awarded for outstanding achievements in criminological research conducted for the reduction of crime and the advancement of human rights. Dr. Petersilia was also awarded an honorary Doctor of Public Policy by the Pardee RAND Graduate School in 2014. Professor Petersilia was also chosen by Stanford University as the recipient of the 2013 Roland Volunteer Service Prize. The Roland prize recognizes a single Stanford faculty member annually who involves students in integrating academic scholarship with significant volunteer service to society. She also serves on the Faculty Steering Committee for Stanford’s Haas Center for Public Service.

The Parole and Release Revocation Advisory Council is comprised of representatives from the U.S. Parole Commission, the Association of Paroling Authorities International (APAI), parole boards, the National Parole Resource Center (NPRC), and the academic and public policy community. This distinguished Advisory Council provides professional guidance and feedback on Parole Release and Revocation research.

Read more about Professor Petersilia, here.

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Joan Petersilia http://www.robinainstitute.org/people/joan-petersilia/ Thu, 19 May 2016 17:05:42 +0000 http://www.robinainstitute.org/?p=6414 Professor Petersilia has spent over 30 years studying the performance of U.S. criminal justice agencies and has been instrumental in affecting sentencing and corrections reform in California and throughout the United States. She is the author of 11 books about … Continue reading

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Professor Petersilia has spent over 30 years studying the performance of U.S. criminal justice agencies and has been instrumental in affecting sentencing and corrections reform in California and throughout the United States. She is the author of 11 books about crime and public policy, and her research on parole reform, prisoner reintegration and sentencing policy has fueled changes in policies throughout the nation. A criminologist with a background in empirical research and social science, Dr. Petersilia is also faculty co-director for the Stanford Criminal Justice Center (SCJC), focusing on policies related to crime control, sentencing, and corrections, and developing nonpartisan analyses and recommendations intended to aid public officials, legal practitioners, and the public in understanding criminal justice policy at the state and national levels. She teaches classes at Stanford Law School on juvenile justice, prisons, community corrections, policy analysis, research methods, and criminal sentencing.

Professor Petersilia was recently honored with the prestigious Stockholm Prize in Criminology (the Nobel Prize in criminology) for her work on prisoner reentry and supporting ex-offenders following release from prison. As the most prestigious award that a criminologist can receive, the Stockholm Prize is awarded for outstanding achievements in criminological research conducted for the reduction of crime and the advancement of human rights. Dr. Petersilia was also awarded an honorary Doctor of Public Policy by the Pardee RAND Graduate School in 2014. Professor Petersilia was also chosen by Stanford University as the recipient of the 2013 Roland Volunteer Service Prize. The Roland prize recognizes a single Stanford faculty member annually who involves students in integrating academic scholarship with significant volunteer service to society. She also serves on the Faculty Steering Committee for Stanford’s Haas Center for Public Service.

Read more about Professor Petersilia, here.

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Improving Parole Release in America http://www.robinainstitute.org/publications/improving-parole-release-america/ Thu, 19 May 2016 15:18:39 +0000 http://www.robinainstitute.org/?p=6409 The Federal Sentencing Reporter recently published an article written by the Robina Institute’s Parole Release and Revocation Project Director, Edward E. Rhine (Ohio State University), Professor Joan Petersilia (Stanford Law School), and Robina Institute Co-Director Professor Kevin R. Reitz (University … Continue reading

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The Federal Sentencing Reporter recently published an article written by the Robina Institute’s Parole Release and Revocation Project Director, Edward E. Rhine (Ohio State University), Professor Joan Petersilia (Stanford Law School), and Robina Institute Co-Director Professor Kevin R. Reitz (University of Minnesota Law School) on “Improving Parole Release in America.”

The article “lays out a ten-point program for the improvement of discretionary parole-release systems in America,” and is drawn from “The Future of Parole Release: A Ten-Point Plan,” in Reinventing American Criminal Justice Systems (Michael Tonry ed., forthcoming 2016); draft available at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2672033.

Citation: Edward E. Rhine, Joan Petersilia, and Kevin R. Reitz, Improving Parole Release in America, 28 Fed. Sent’g. Rep., 2, 96-104 (2015).

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Robina Welcomes New Advisory Members to Parole and Probation Projects http://www.robinainstitute.org/news/robina-welcomes-new-advisory-members-parole-probation-projects/ Thu, 12 May 2016 17:45:06 +0000 http://www.robinainstitute.org/?p=6396 The Robina Institute of Criminal Law and Criminal Justice is pleased to announce new advisory members to our Parole Release and Revocation Project and Probation Revocation Project: J. Patricia Wilson Smoot, Chair, United States Parole Commission and Thomas Williams, Retired, … Continue reading

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The Robina Institute of Criminal Law and Criminal Justice is pleased to announce new advisory members to our Parole Release and Revocation Project and Probation Revocation Project: J. Patricia Wilson Smoot, Chair, United States Parole Commission and Thomas Williams, Retired, American Probation and Parole Association.

J. Patricia Wilson Smoot, Chair of the U.S. Parole Commission, joined the Parole Release and Revocation Project in April. Ms. Smoot was designated Chair of the United States Parole Commission in 2015, having served on the Commission since 2010. Before her appointment, she served as Deputy State’s Attorney for Prince George’s County, Maryland, one of the largest prosecutor’s offices in the State of Maryland. As part of her duties, Ms. Smoot oversaw the Sex Offense and Child Abuse Unit, the Domestic Violence Unit, the Juvenile Division, and the District Court Division, while serving as an advisor to the State’s Attorney.

Thomas H. Williams joined the Probation Revocation Project Advisory Board in April. He is a former Executive Board Member of the American Probation and Parole Association, the past chair of the Washington/Baltimore High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA), a former board member of the National Association of Drug Court Professionals, and former Vice President of the National Association of Probation Executives. Mr. Williams received a B.S. Degree in Law Enforcement from the University of Baltimore and an M.S. Degree in Guidance and Counseling from Loyola College of Baltimore.

The Robina Institute of Criminal Law and Criminal Justice is thrilled to welcome Ms. Smoot and Mr. Williams to our distinguished advisory groups.

Read more about J. Patricia Smoot, here.

Read more about Thomas H. Williams, here.

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Kelly Mitchell on KSTP Discussing Civil Commitment http://www.robinainstitute.org/news/kelly-mitchell-kstp-discussing-civil-commitment/ Thu, 12 May 2016 17:31:40 +0000 http://www.robinainstitute.org/?p=6391 Robina Institute Executive Director Kelly Mitchell was interviewed this week by Jessica Miles of KSTP TV regarding civil commitment. The interview took place as part of KSTP’s coverage on the Mark Meihofer case in St. Paul. You can learn more … Continue reading

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Robina Institute Executive Director Kelly Mitchell was interviewed this week by Jessica Miles of KSTP TV regarding civil commitment. The interview took place as part of KSTP’s coverage on the Mark Meihofer case in St. Paul.
You can learn more and watch video of their coverage, here.

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Kedar Hickman http://www.robinainstitute.org/people/kedar-hickman/ Fri, 06 May 2016 18:40:03 +0000 http://www.robinainstitute.org/?p=6386 Kedar Hickman is the Program Manager, Ujamaa Place. For 22 years Kedar has worked within the fields of Education, Youth, Human, Community and Economic Development. During that time, He’s developed an expertise in working with people to realize their growth potential through education, self-empowerment, leadership, citizenship, and skills building. Kedar has … Continue reading

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Kedar Hickman is the Program Manager, Ujamaa Place. For 22 years Kedar has worked within the fields of Education, Youth, Human, Community and Economic Development. During that time, He’s developed an expertise in working with people to realize their growth potential through education, self-empowerment, leadership, citizenship, and skills building. Kedar has taught and instructed on education levels ranging from primary to adult. He also in that time has worked with community businesses and organizations to build strategies that enmesh them into and better serve the communities in which they are located. Kedar’s work experience has been in both the public and private/ nonprofit sectors. 

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Myron Orfield http://www.robinainstitute.org/people/myron-orfield/ Fri, 06 May 2016 18:37:18 +0000 http://www.robinainstitute.org/?p=6382 Professor Myron Orfield is the Director of the Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity. He has written three books and dozens of articles and book chapters on local government law, spatial inequality, fair housing, school desegregation, charter schools, state and local taxation … Continue reading

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Professor Myron Orfield is the Director of the Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity. He has written three books and dozens of articles and book chapters on local government law, spatial inequality, fair housing, school desegregation, charter schools, state and local taxation and finance, and land use law. The syndicated columnist Neal Peirce called him “the most influential demographer in America’s burgeoning regional movement.” Orfield’s research has led to legislative and judicial reforms at the federal level and state level reform in Minnesota, Illinois, Michigan, California, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Washington, Oregon, and Maryland. Professor Orfield has been a litigator in a large law firm, a civil rights lawyer, and an assistant attorney general of Minnesota, representing Minnesota in appellate courts, including the United States Supreme Court. He has been a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington and led both a national non-profit organization and a private research firm with clients all over the United States. Orfield was elected to both the Minnesota House of Representatives and Senate, where he was the architect of a series of important legislative changes in land use, fair housing, and school and local government aid programs. Recently, Orfield served on the National Commission on Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity, as an academic advisor to the Congressional Black Caucus, an advisor to President Obama’s transition team for urban policy, to the White House Office of Urban Affairs, and as special consultant to the HUD’s Office for Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity. At FHEO, Professor Orfield assisted in the development of the Fair Housing Act’s Discriminatory Effects Standard (the “disparate impact rule”) (78 Fed. Reg. 11460) and the Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing Rule (80 Fed.Reg. 42272).

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Robina In Conversation Series: Racial Disparities in the Criminal Justice System http://www.robinainstitute.org/events/racial-disparities-criminal-justice-system/ Fri, 06 May 2016 18:25:12 +0000 http://www.robinainstitute.org/?p=6374 Join the Conversation Please join the Robina Institute of Criminal Law and Criminal Justice for our next Robina In Conversation, “Racial Disparities in the Criminal Justice System,” onTuesday, June 7, 2016  from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. in the Cowles Auditorium at the … Continue reading

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Join the Conversation

Please join the Robina Institute of Criminal Law and Criminal Justice for our next Robina In Conversation“Racial Disparities in the Criminal Justice System,” onTuesday, June 7, 2016  from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. in the Cowles Auditorium at the Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota. We will continue the conversation at a reception after the discussion in the Humphrey Atrium from 5:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.

Racial Disparities in the Criminal Justice System

Numerous studies have found that African Americans, Native Americans, and other racial and ethnic minorities are disproportionately represented in prison and jail populations relative to their numbers in the general population.  Similar disparities are found at earlier stages of criminal justice processing, beginning with investigatory stops and arrests by the police, and all of these disparities are worse in Minnesota than for the nation as a whole.  What accounts for these persistent disparities, and what can be done about them?  Some observers see such disparities as the product of overt and implicit bias by criminal justice officials and policy makers; others claim that such disparities primarily reflect racial and ethnic differences in criminal offending.

This Robina In Conversation will examine three of the most important causes of racial disparities in criminal justice: First, disproportionate numbers of non-whites enter the criminal justice system due to the combined effects of law enforcement decisions and socio-economic disparities correlated with race.  Second, racial disproportionality increases as cases move through the criminal justice system due to factors such as implicit bias, inadequate defense resources, and decision criteria such as offender prior record and employment that have a strongly disparate racial impact.  Third, in a wide variety of ways, criminal justice processing, punishments, and conviction records compound and worsen the individual, family, and community disadvantages suffered by low-income minorities, who are already burdened by multiple, mutually-reinforcing disadvantages; this compounding effect greatly increases the risk that minority offenders and others in their families and communities will re-enter the criminal justice system, where they face enhanced penalties and further compounding of disadvantage.

The panel discussion will be moderated by Robina Fellow Dr. Rhys Hester. We will hear from University of Minnesota Law Professors Richard Frase, Perry Moriearty, and Myron Orfield, and from Kedar Hickman, Program Manager at Ujamaa Place in St. Paul. The professors have done extensive research on problems of racial disparity in criminal justice, and the combined disadvantages of race and poverty. Mr. Hickman works with African American offenders reentering the community, and in the fields of Education, Youth, and Human, Community, and Economic Development.

Join us on June 7, 2016 at 3:00 p.m. in Cowles Auditorium, Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs.

Continue the conversation after the panel discussion at a post-event reception in the Humphrey Atrium. 

Continuing Legal Education

  • An application for 1 standard Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credit will be submitted.
  • An application for 1 Elimination of Bias credit will be submitted.
  • Registration required for in-person, livestream online, and on demand viewing if you would like CLE.

Watch the In Conversation Live

Can’t make the event in person? Watch the livestream on this page beginning at 3 p.m.on June 7, 2016.

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